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Navigation tip: find out about sources of air quality pollutants and seasonal air quality patterns in this town by selecting the town name above. View regional summary results by selecting Air Quality.

Wainuiomata (Moohan Street)

The Wainuiomata air quality site is located on Moohan Street  about 1 km south east of the town's shopping centre. The site was established in 2000 and until 2006 PM10 was measured every third day using a high volume sampler. Continuous PM10 monitoring using the automatic method started in mid 2006 and PM2.5 monitoring was added in early 2012.

⚠️ Air quality data from Greater Wellington monitoring sites are currently unable to be displayed on LAWA due to a data server issue.  In the meantime, please see https://graphs.gw.govt.nz/ for air quality data.

This site primarily measures the impact of emissions from home heating fires on air quality. PM10 and PM2.5 levels are highest during cold winter evenings when there is little wind and clear skies. PM10 levels measured at this site meet guidelines and standards. Air quality measured at the site has been improving since 2007, but this trend has not changed since 2012.

 

Scientific Indicators
Scientific data for this site

This dashboard shows the latest results for air quality indicators collected by regional councils and unitary authorities.  Indicators are shown against the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality (NES-AQ).  Where no national standards exist for the air quality measurements shown, the data are compared against other guidelines (e.g. World Health Organization (WHO) 2021 guidelines, Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (AAQG)).  

Select 'Show more information +' under a dashboard to see the current and historical monitoring data.

 

  • PM10 Data verified to 31/12/2021
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    • Exceedance
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    PM10 information

    • Hourly
    • Daily
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    • Annual
    • Exceedances
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    Months:
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    Showing:

    Guideline


    Concentration (µg/m3)


    Wind speed (km/h)


    Air temperature (℃)


    Guideline

    What is this graph showing me?

    This graph shows how concentrations of PM10 change on an hourly, daily, monthly or annual basis for the selected time period. The number of exceedance days can be viewed over the last 10 years or all years if available.

    The PM10 daily average concentrations and exceedance days are compared to the National Standard (NES-AQ), and the PM10 annual average concentrations are compared to the WHO guideline.  The standard and guideline limits are denoted by the red horizontal line.   There are no guidelines for hourly or monthly average concentrations.  For information about allowable exceedances and targets, and the limitations of data shown, see the factsheet on monitoring air quality in New Zealand. 

    The concentrations depend on local sources of emissions and weather conditions. Emissions from various sources change, depending on whether it's a weekday or the weekend or at different times of the year (e.g. emissions from home heating go up in the cold winter months).  Still conditions often lead to high concentrations, as there is no wind to blow away the pollutants in the air.  At some monitoring sites, the hourly temperature and wind data are available to explore the relationship between local weather conditions and PM10 concentrations.  See this factsheet about why air quality is important and factors that influence air quality. 

  • PM2.5 Data verified to 31/12/2021
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    • Exceedance
      2023
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    PM2.5 information

    • Hourly
    • Daily
    • Monthly
    • Annual
    • Exceedances
    • Show wind speed
    • Show temperature
    Months:
    -
    Showing:

    Guideline


    Concentration (µg/m3)


    Wind speed (km/h)


    Air temperature (℃)


    Guideline

    What is this graph showing me?

    This graph shows how concentrations of PM2.5 change on an hourly, daily, monthly or annual basis for the selected time period. The number of exceedance days can be viewed over the last 10 years or all years if available.

    The PM2.5 concentrations and exceedance days are compared to the WHO guidelines.  The guideline limits are denoted by the red horizontal line.  There are no guidelines for hourly or monthly average concentrations.  For information about allowable exceedances and targets, and the limitations of data shown, see the factsheet on monitoring air quality in New Zealand. 

    The concentrations depend on local sources of emissions and weather conditions. Emissions from various sources change, depending on whether it's a weekday or the weekend or at different times of the year (e.g. emissions from home heating go up in the cold winter months).  Still conditions often lead to high concentrations, as there is no wind to blow away the pollutants in the air.  At some monitoring sites, the hourly temperature and wind data are available to explore the relationship between local weather conditions and PM2.5 concentrations.  See this factsheet about why air quality is important and factors that influence air quality.