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Lake Wanaka

Lake Wanaka is a popular resort, and is much used in the summer for fishing, boating and swimming. The nearby mountains and fast-flowing rivers allow for adventure tourism year-round.

Lake Wanaka is located in the Queensland-Lakes Region of Otago, its name is Māori, a corruption of Oanaka ('The place of Anaka', a local tribal chief). Lake Wanaka covers an area of 192 km2. which makes it the fourth larges New Zealand lake. It is 277m above sea level, is up to 311m deep and has a catchment area of 2590km2, inflows to the lake are the Makarora River at the north end and the Matukituki River on the south-west side. The outflow (where the lake is monitored) is to the south-east by way of the Clutha River. The monitoring between 2006 and 2009 shows that Lake Wanaka appears to be in a stable state, with little change in water quality occurring over the last three years. Lake Wanaka is classified as being in an oligotrophic state. A water body’s trophic state is largely determined by nutrient inputs from the surrounding catchment (Barnes, 2002). The major inputs into Lake Wanaka are the Makarora and Matukituki Rivers, both of which have glacial origins and high water quality. The immediate catchment is likely to contribute some nutrient input into the lake i.e. stormwater from the township of Wanaka and runoff from fertilised agricultural areas. In addition to ongoing sheep farming, the lake is now a popular resort, and is much used in the summer for fishing, boating and swimming. The nearby mountains and fast-flowing rivers allow for adventure tourism year-round, with jetboating and skiing facilities located nearby

Lake Summary
  • Lake size
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  • Maximum depth
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  • Catchment size
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Scientific data for this lake

This dashboard shows information on the data collected by the regional councils for two lake water quality and ecological condition measurements. Lake SPI (Lake Submerged Plant Indicators) and TLI (Trophic Level):

  • Water Quality

    Trophic Level Index (TLI)

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    This measure is the Trophic Level Index (TLI). The TLI indicates the lifesupporting capacity of a lake and is based on four water quality indicators.

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    Trophic Level Index (TLI) history for this lake

    Trophic Level Indicator (TLI) which measures four parameters: water clarity, chlorophyll content, total phosphorus and total nitrogen. From these parameters a TLI value is calculated. In cases where water clarity data is missing a three parameter TLI is calculated. The higher the value, the greater the nutrients and fertility of the water which encourages growth, including algal blooms. As a rule, higher TLI scores mean poorer water quality. View a factsheet on TLI

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    TLI history for Lake Wanaka
    Year
    TLI history for Lake Wanaka data table
    Year TLI Score
    Year TLI Score

    What do the icons mean?

    VERY GOOD
    Very good water quality. Trophic Level Index of less than 2. Microtrophic lake conditions.
    GOOD
    Good water quality. Trophic Level Index of 2-3. Oligotrophic lake conditions.
    AVERAGE
    Average water quality. Trophic Level Index of 3-4. Mesotrophic lake conditions.
    POOR
    Poor water quality. Trophic Level Index of 4-5. Eutrophic lake conditions.
    VERY POOR
    Very poor water quality. Trophic Level Index of greater than 5. Supertrophic lake conditions.
    NO DATA
    No data available.
  • Ecological Conditions

    Submerged Plant Indicators (SPI)

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    The LakeSPI status describes the ecological condition of the lake and is based on plants present.

    LakeSPI data provided by NIWA

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    LakeSPI history for this lake

    LakeSPI (Lake Submerged Plant Indicators) is a method of characterising the ecological condition of lakes based on the composition of native and invasive plants growing in them. A higher LakeSPI percentage result is associated with better ecological health:

    LakeSPI N/A
    LakeSPI {{spiData.grades[0].Value}}%

    The overall LakeSPI score is calculated using a Native Condition Index ('good' plants) and an Invasive Impact Index (introduced, non-native plants):

    Native Condition N/A
    Native Condition {{spiData.grades[0].NativeIndex}}%
    Invasive Impact N/A
    Invasive Impact {{spiData.grades[0].InvasiveIndex}}%

    A higher Native Condition percentage is also good, but a higher Invasive Impact percentage is bad. View a factsheet on SPI

    • SPI %
    • Native Condition %
    • Invasive Impact %
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    LakeSPI history for Lake Wanaka
    Year
    LakeSPI history for Lake Wanaka data table
    Sample Date Status LakeSPI % Native Condition Index % Invasive Impact Index %
    LakeSPI information has been provided by NIWA.

    What do the icons mean?

    EXCELLENT
    Excellent ecological health. A LakeSPI score of 75-100%.
    HIGH
    High ecological health. A LakeSPI score of 50-75%.
    MODERATE
    Moderate ecological health. A LakeSPI score of 20-50%.
    POOR
    Poor ecological health. A LakeSPI score of 0-20%.
    NON-VEG
    Non-vegetated. A LakeSPI score of 0% (there are no plants present).
    NO DATA
    No data available.

Download Data

.ZIP file of lake data.
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Disclaimer

 LAWA Partners shall not be liable, whether in contract, tort, equity or otherwise, for any loss or damage of any type (including consequential losses) arising directly or indirectly from the inadequacy, inaccuracy or any other deficiency in information supplied irrespective of the cause.  Use of information supplied is entirely at the risk of the recipient and shall be deemed to be acceptance of this liability exclusion.

Sites

Monitored sites on Lake Wanaka

...retrieving sites.

No sites found.