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Navigation tip: find out about sources of air quality pollutants and seasonal air quality patterns in this town by selecting the town name above. View regional summary results by selecting Air Quality.

Gisborne Boys' High School

The monitoring site has been located on the grounds of Gisborne Boys' High School since 2004 and the data is telemetered. This site gives a good representation of PM10 and PM2.5 levels in relation to residential areas within Gisborne City. This hardware was upgraded to optical methodology (T640x) in 2019. Since installation of this equipment, higher levels of PM than previous years have been recorded.

The BAM meter was first established at Gisborne Boys' High School in March 2006. It was removed from the site from June 2007 until April 2011 to allow for a large gymnasium to be built near the site. After re-establishment of the air quality monitoring, the data produced by the BAM was manually downloaded, processed and reported on. In January 2016 a telemetered system was installed allowing the viewing of real time data and to provide alerts should air quality exceedances be detected, or power or equipment failures occur. This has proved to be invaluable and data reporting has been greatly enhanced as a result, however gaps were still present in the data due to equipment or power failures at the site.  This hardware was upgraded in 2018.

Scientific Indicators
Scientific data for this site

This dashboard shows the latest results for air quality indicators collected by regional councils and unitary authorities.  Indicators are shown against the National Environmental Standards for Air Quality (NES-AQ).  Where no national standards exist for the air quality measurements shown, the data are compared against other guidelines (e.g. World Health Organization (WHO) 2021 guidelines, Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (AAQG)).  

Select 'Show more information +' under a dashboard to see the current and historical monitoring data.

 

  • PM10 Data verified to 20/06/2023
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    • Exceedance
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    PM10 information

    • Hourly
    • Daily
    • Monthly
    • Annual
    • Exceedances
    • Show wind speed
    • Show temperature
    Months:
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    Showing:

    Guideline


    Concentration (µg/m3)


    Wind speed (km/h)


    Air temperature (℃)


    Guideline

    What is this graph showing me?

    This graph shows how concentrations of PM10 change on an hourly, daily, monthly or annual basis for the selected time period. The number of exceedance days can be viewed over the last 10 years or all years if available.

    The PM10 daily average concentrations and exceedance days are compared to the National Standard (NES-AQ), and the PM10 annual average concentrations are compared to the WHO guideline.  The standard and guideline limits are denoted by the red horizontal line.   There are no guidelines for hourly or monthly average concentrations.  For information about allowable exceedances and targets, and the limitations of data shown, see the factsheet on monitoring air quality in New Zealand. 

    The concentrations depend on local sources of emissions and weather conditions. Emissions from various sources change, depending on whether it's a weekday or the weekend or at different times of the year (e.g. emissions from home heating go up in the cold winter months).  Still conditions often lead to high concentrations, as there is no wind to blow away the pollutants in the air.  At some monitoring sites, the hourly temperature and wind data are available to explore the relationship between local weather conditions and PM10 concentrations.  See this factsheet about why air quality is important and factors that influence air quality. 

  • PM2.5 Data verified to 20/06/2023
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    • Exceedance
      2024
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      Exceedance
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    Show more information Hide information

    PM2.5 information

    • Hourly
    • Daily
    • Monthly
    • Annual
    • Exceedances
    • Show wind speed
    • Show temperature
    Months:
    -
    Showing:

    Guideline


    Concentration (µg/m3)


    Wind speed (km/h)


    Air temperature (℃)


    Guideline

    What is this graph showing me?

    This graph shows how concentrations of PM2.5 change on an hourly, daily, monthly or annual basis for the selected time period. The number of exceedance days can be viewed over the last 10 years or all years if available.

    The PM2.5 concentrations and exceedance days are compared to the WHO guidelines.  The guideline limits are denoted by the red horizontal line.  There are no guidelines for hourly or monthly average concentrations.  For information about allowable exceedances and targets, and the limitations of data shown, see the factsheet on monitoring air quality in New Zealand. 

    The concentrations depend on local sources of emissions and weather conditions. Emissions from various sources change, depending on whether it's a weekday or the weekend or at different times of the year (e.g. emissions from home heating go up in the cold winter months).  Still conditions often lead to high concentrations, as there is no wind to blow away the pollutants in the air.  At some monitoring sites, the hourly temperature and wind data are available to explore the relationship between local weather conditions and PM2.5 concentrations.  See this factsheet about why air quality is important and factors that influence air quality.