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Bay of Plenty region

Groundwater Zone: Ohiwa and Waiotahe

This Water Management Area (WMA) has a low population and extensive hill country, which is very prone to mass movement erosion due to coastal storms and intense rainfall. The one major river, the Nukuhou, is vulnerable to riverbank erosion and this affects Ōhiwa Harbour, which is a highly valued estuary.  This WMA is served by the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum (OHIF), which oversees the implementation of an operational Ōhiwa Harbour strategy.  Membership of the forum comprises Ōpōtiki and Whakatāne District Councils, Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Whakatōhea, Upokorehe, Ngāti Awa and Ngāi Tūhoe.

This area includes Ōhiwa Harbour, one of New Zealand's most unspoiled harbours. A number of catchment streams flow into the harbour and fencing work to protect them from stock access is continuing. Of the total 28.8km of Ōhiwa Harbour catchment stream margins, 25km are protected.

The streams feeding the harbour are home to significant numbers of native freshwater fish, such as inanga (whitebait). It has extensive exotic forestry, 42 dairy farms and 40 kiwifruit blocks.

There is limited groundwater available, due to the geology of the area.

Water Use
Groundwater in this zone

Regional councils collect information about how much water is available and manage resource consents for those wishing to take water from groundwater supplies. Use the buttons below to view regional information on: how much water is available, where it comes from and how its used.

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Groundwater available: {{waterSource.availableToAllocate}} Irrigation
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Industrial
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Stock
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Hydroelectrical
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Town supply
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  • Groundwater in this zone
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    Groundwater in this zone

    Accurately estimating the total amount of water available in a groundwater management zone is not currently possible. Regional Councils are working with the Ministry for the Environment on the best way to calculate this figure. We will include these figures on LAWA when they become available. In the meantime, for more information about a particular groundwater management zone, contact your regional council.

  • Water consents: How much water is consented and used?

    Groundwater available to consent

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    Consented water in this groundwater zone

    Use the tables below to look at how much water is available compared with how much is actually consented within this water management zone. Click the plus to expand subzones where available

    {{item.zoneId}}
    Comparing consents and use
    Amount available to consent In this groundwater management zone:
    {{item.data.totalAvailableAmount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableUnits}}
    available to consent
    Amount consented
    measured and non measured
    Amount used (measured)
    Amount Units Consented or used as a percentage of available
    Total available to consent {{item.data.totalAvailableAmount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableAmount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableUnits}}
    Total consented {{item.data.totalConsented.amount}} {{item.data.totalConsented.amount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableUnits}} {{item.data.totalConsented.percentText}}
    Total consented and measured {{item.data.totalMeasured.amount}} {{item.data.totalMeasured.amount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableUnits}} {{item.data.totalMeasured.percentText}}
    Total measured amount used {{item.data.totalAmountUsed.amount}} {{item.data.totalAvailableUnits}} {{item.data.totalAmountUsed.percentText}}
    Total measured volume used {{item.data.totalAnnualVolumeUsed}} {{item.data.totalAnnualVolumeUnits}}

    The table above shows the amount of water that is available for use compared to the amount that has been consented. The ‘Total Consented’ and ‘Total Consented and Measured’ fields are based on percentages of the ‘Total available to Consent’ field. If this field is not populated no data will be displayed. Some consents require actual use to be monitored and this is presented as 'Total measured volume Used' where available.

    Bay of Plenty Regional Council is currently compiling and moving consent data into a new database. Once this process is completed, detailed consent information missing from the table above will be made available. The expected date for delivery of the detailed consent information is the fourth quarter of 2015.

     At present we can only provide the following regional summary information:

    The total number of water take consents in the Bay of Plenty is 1294 (as at February 2013), with 929 (72 percent) being groundwater and 365 (28percent) being surface water.

    Horticulture is the predominant activity (61percent of consents), followed by potable/commercial use (28percent) and agriculture (11percent).

    Of the current consents, 582 (45percent) were granted before the enactment of the RMA in 1991 and therefore have a 35-year term (expiry in 2026). New consent terms are granted a 10-year term with monitoring and review conditions.

    Summary consent information suggests a number of surface and groundwater sources are allocated above the current defined allocable flows. However it is important to balance the information on allocation with actual measurements of the resource, to determine whether surface water flows or groundwater levels are being adversely affected. Initial analysis and observation of surface and groundwater suggests the current levels of allocation are not having a widespread negative impact on water resources, but further monitoring and science to improve understanding is under way.

  • Water consents: How is consented water used?

    Consents by use in this groundwater zone

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    Consented water in this zone

    Overall annual volume for {{waterAvailable.year}}
    Relative breakdown
    Activity Percentage of total consented Total volume Number of consents
    {{item.displayText}} {{item.displayText}} - - No data available {{item.breakdownPercentage}}% {{item.totalVolume}} m3 {{item.numberOfConsents}}
    Total {{waterUsage.total.percentageConsented}}% {{waterUsage.total.totalVolume}} m3 {{waterUsage.total.numberOfConsents}}

    The above table shows the proportion of water consented for irrigation, industrial, stock, town supply and other. It excludes hydro electricity. In this region/management zone {{hydroUsage.totalVolume}} m3/year is consented for hydro-electricity and makes up {{hydroUsage.percentageConsented}}% of the total water volume consented for this region/management zone

    Bay of Plenty Regional Council is currently compiling and moving consent data into a new database. Once this process is completed, detailed consent information missing from the table above will be made available. The expected date for delivery of the detailed consent information is the fourth quarter of 2015.

     At present we can only provide the following regional summary information:

    The total number of water take consents in the Bay of Plenty is 1294 (as at February 2013), with 929 (72 percent) being groundwater and 365 (28percent) being surface water.

    Horticulture is the predominant activity (61percent of consents), followed by potable/commercial use (28percent) and agriculture (11percent).

    Of the current consents, 582 (45percent) were granted before the enactment of the RMA in 1991 and therefore have a 35-year term (expiry in 2026). New consent terms are granted a 10-year term with monitoring and review conditions.

    Summary consent information suggests a number of surface and groundwater sources are allocated above the current defined allocable flows. However it is important to balance the information on allocation with actual measurements of the resource, to determine whether surface water flows or groundwater levels are being adversely affected. Initial analysis and observation of surface and groundwater suggests the current levels of allocation are not having a widespread negative impact on water resources, but further monitoring and science to improve understanding is under way.

Sites

Monitored sites in this Zone

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